Wildlife

Radio Collar Tracking

The FZS (Frankfurt Zoological Society) have been running some successful projects in the Jambi region of Sumatra. One of those being the tracking of wild elephants through the use of radio collars. By attaching a radio collar to one elephant in a herd the FZS team can effectively track the entre herd and can act quickly in the event the herd might get too close to a village. This helps prevent human/elephant conflict and further deaths of the critically endangered Sumatran elephant.

Full article on Elephants of Sumatra http://elephantsofsumatra.com/radio-collar-tracking/

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EoS Book Excerpt (Elephants of Sumatra) – The Projects

Below is a sample extract from the up coming Elephants of Sumatra – The Final Stand documentary photography book being published in support of the critically endangered sumatran elephants and the various projects we have, projects we support directly in the field or indirectly by other means. The final product will be a 100 page photography documentary book created by Berdiri Founder Bruce Levick based on the back of 3 years in the field documenting

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Elephant Response Unit – Way Kambas

Last week we took a field trip to the Way Kambas National Park in South Sumatra to present some new technologies to the current existing Elephant Response Units working around the borders of the Way Kambas National Park. The ERU (Elephant Response Units) work the borders of the National Park to mitigate HEC (Human Elephant Conflict) and also patrol for illegal activity.

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Presenting and testing the drone in the Way Kambas National Park.

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Presenting and testing the drone in the Way Kambas National Park.

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photo of the southern camp of Way Kambas taken during our drone tests

We have presented an opportunity for the ERU teams to utilise drone technology along with infrared cameras to help search the surrounding areas for potential wild herds on the move towards neighbouring villages to better prevent future HEC.

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The elephant patrols in action

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The elephant patrols in action

The proposal for the use of drone technology can also be used to assist in the search for potential illegal activity within the national park such as poachers and illegal loggers.

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Bath time before patrol

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Morning bath time before heading out for patrol

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Cooking up supplements for the patrol elephants

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Preparing the supplements for the patrol elephants

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Drone view of the ERU team camp

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Drone demonstration for the ERU team

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New Deaths of Sumatran Elephants in Riau

It’s been a tragic week for the Sumatran elephant with 7 new deaths recorded in the Riau province of Sumatra near the Tesso Nilo National park. Poisoning is suspected and is becoming more and more common as elephants are forced to enter village areas when their habitat is continuously being destroyed to make way for crop land, majority being for palm oil. Villagers tend to take action on their own and poison the elephants to stop the destruction of food crops that the elephants eat. So the question being asked, “Is palm oil killing elephants?”, the answer is a most definite yes and more than anything else combined.

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Illegally burning and clearing forests the vital habitat is causing more and more elephant conflicts throughout Sumatra.

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Sumatran Tiger – Nowhere to Hide

Recently I travelled to north Sumatra documenting the work of an NGO based in Sumatra for captive elephants. I stumbled across this wildlife trade report on the Sumatran tiger while traveling through the elephant camps in North Sumatra. It was funded and put together by Traffic

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God

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Perhaps no other place is more globally recognized as a symbol of the African continent

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The Trafficking of the Tokay Gecko

Tokay Gecko

Recently a new study has found that millions of Tokay Geckos are being harvested more so for traditional medicines in East Asia. It was at one stage reported that Tokay Geckos were being harvested as a supposed cure for aids. But this is no longer the case. The demand for trafficking of Tokay Geckos has increased remarkably and while a lot of East Asia are breeding them in captivity the supply does not meet the demand. For a more in depth look on the study, head over to www.traffic.org.

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Sumatra the Final Stand for Endangered Animals

Sumatra: Where wildlife and humans are foes in a bitter and constant struggle for land

Sumatra elephants

Sumatran elephants at a captive elephant camp

Statistics never tell the whole story. The same is true for the Indonesian island of Sumatra and the continued assault on its ecology by humans. Home to over 50 million people, Sumatra is the world’s fourth most populous island, but then that does not start saying even half the story.

but most of all, the wanton massacre of its amazing wildlife

The ever-burgeoning population is really what lies at the heart of this tale. A story of forest degradation, soil erosion, a constant onslaught on the island`s ecology, but most of all, the wanton massacre of its amazing wildlife like the Sumatran Orangutan, the Sumatran Tiger, the rhinoceros, and last but certainly not the least, the Sumatran Elephant.

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Sumatran elephants at a captive elephant camp

Sumatra is home to a variety of ethnic groups like the Batak, Minangkabau, Krui, and Pelalawan-Petalangan. For centuries, man and animal stayed more or less in consonance with each other, both living off the land, taking only as much as was needed to survive.

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precious sumatran jungle

Till man turned greedy. The onset of industrialisation followed by the globalisation of recent years has taken its toll on Sumatra. Here, statistics is but one weapon that Green warriors wield to wage an important battle against the

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Illegal Pet Trade – Sun Bears

Illegal pet trade of sun bears in and around South East Asia.

Astronomers are still in search of an exoplanet that is as fertile with rich diversity of flora and fauna as planet Earth. Instead of protecting this planet by understanding its true worth, engaging in activities to plunder the nature and its inhabitants in the form of illegal wildlife trade is certainly a folly. However, given the fact that illegal wildlife trade is worth of nearly $10 billion, morals and ethics of people who plunder the wildlife take a back seat.

Legally, one can obtain permit for import or export of some wildlife species, but, generally, wildlife trade is a matter of conservation of endangered species. Illegal pet trade is active in Europe, Asia, Arabia, and North and South America. The most rampant of all is the illegal pet trade of sun bears in and around Southeast Asia. Sun bears – smallest of the bear species with a crescent on its chest – are on the verge of extinction in tropical rainforests of Southeast Asia. Since the past few decades, the population of sun bears in Southeast Asia has gone down drastically with a decrease of 30% of the overall population

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